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20120925
20121003
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
in case any other ieds have been laid on the road. recently the taliban have been planting ieds that are almost impossible to detect because they contain little if any metal. a sign the enemy is becoming much more sophisticated. lieutenant mohamed is leading this operation. the 30-year-old who oearns less than $300 a month tells me, i do this because it's my job. i'm prepared to lose my own life, but i don't want other people to die. at the beginning of the year the afghan army had no idea how to diffuse an ied other than to shoot it or set it on fire. now with the right training and equipment they have the skills to disable these deadly devices. after 20 minutes, the soldiers determine the site is clear claiming the taliban either removed it once it had been reported or a local took the ied to claim the $100 reward. in the last few months there have been alarming reports of the taliban returning and even overrunning checkpoints. the taliban are a resilient enemy and constantly trying to infiltrate the ranks. while there have been no insider attacks by the men under his watch, h
, also known as "el taliban", along with two associates yesterday. this morning, mexican authorities paraded him before the media, wearing a bulletproof vest. caballero leads a faction of the powerful zetas cartel. he's the third cartel leader to be captured this month. territorial disputes between the zetas and gulf cartels have led to widespread violence in northern mexico in recent weeks. the u.s. army paused today for mandatory suicide prevention training. record high rates prompted the army-wide initiative. the number of suicides among service members each year has nearly doubled since 2005. and from june to july of this year the number of suicides outpaced combat deaths of active-duty soldiers. the last stand-down training for suicide prevention was in 2009. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. > brown: the state department is temporarily withdrawing more staff from the u.s. embassy in tripoli, libya for what it called security reasons, according to a department official in new york. meanwhile, the obama administration is still trying to determine who w
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)